HOME | ABOUT US | SUBMIT MUSICLINERS | CHART REPORTING | ARTIST A to Z | INTERVIEWS | MUSIC REVIEWS | @ AMAZON | CONTACT US
banner image
Created especially for our GLOBAL LISTENING AUDIENCE and YOU
image
image
streetjazz banner
Personal Notes - The History Of Jazz - Part 1
In Part One of 'The History Of Jazz' I try to piece together the beginnings of the genre that we love so much today and uncover the musicians who pathed the way for the music that we listen to today.  
wes george

If you are already a jazz aficionado you will already be aware of the following details so this article is aimed at those of you who are 'new to Jazz' or 'catching up'.

YOU CAN GET INVOLVED IN THIS PROJECT TOO
Whenever an artist is mentioned in the articles, YOU can send us your take on THEIR BIOGRAPHY and we will link it to a separate page with your credits. Send us the Biographies to info@jazznet247.net ( We will reserve the right to edit before publishing ) - See Louis Armstrong

The History Of Jazz - Part 1 - Where It All Began

New Orleans is and was an exceptional place, originally a French settlement it only became part of the USA with the purchase of Louisiana in 1803. Sited on the banks of the Mississippi river it looked south to Latin America and the Caribbean, hence this element in New Orleans music which Jelly Roll Morton dubbed 'The Spanish Tinge'.

Throughout the nineteenth century, New Orleans retained a French-speaking upper class called 'The Creoles', who looked to Paris for their culture. It was tough, the street parades were still an essential part of city life and might result in pitched battles between the inhabitants of the rival areas. Jelly Roll Morton recounted " If they'd have ten fights on a Sunday, they didn't have many."

No doubt the reality could be squalid but with hindsight, old-time New Orleans sounds wonderful. the street parades, Mardi Gras, picnics, dances, funerals, brothels in the memories of those who lived through it, all of these merged into one enormous party.

Consequently there was a tremendous demand for one commodity, 'music'. It was met largely by two groups:- working-class blacks and the Creoles of colour. It is in this interaction between these two that many have seen to be the 'origin of jazz'.

The Creoles were craftsmen and small tradesmen, cigar-makers, shoemakers, tailors and jealous of their status who played with a conventional, legitimate technique.

As against the Creoles' well-trained fluency, the black musicians had one great asset, the rhythmic flair which came from Africa. They didn't, and generally couldn't, read musical scores, but instead played 'head music', i.e. by ear and memory.

When they got to New Orleans the black players took up the instruments of the creole bands e.g. cornet, trombone, clarinet, tuba, bass, but at moments of emotional climax they continued to roughen their instrumental sounds as a gospel or blues singer would, and like an African drummer - 'they swung'.

The exact sequence of events i.e. 'who contributed to what and when' we are never likely to know as no recordings were made of New Orleans jazz until 1917, and none by black or Creole musicians until several years after that.

The first major player of whom we hear was a black barber and cornettist named Buddy Bolden (1877-1931), but Bolden made no records and was committed to a mental hospital in 1907 where he remained for the rest of his life. He was noted for his forceful sound and blues playing, but probably he remained closer to ragtime rhythm than to fully-fledged jazz.

The first jazz musicians of whom we have adequate recordings were born a little later. Most important amongst them were Joe "King" Oliver (1885-1938), Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton (1890-1941), Sidney Bechet (1897-1959) and Louis Armstrong (1901-1971), all of whom recorded, but not in New Orleans as there were no studios there until later on, but in Chicago.

The cornet was the dominating instrument in New Orleans bands, the one around which the others pivoted. New Orleans jazz is an ensemble music, from time to time one instrument comes to the fore, then another, but much of the time most of the musicians are playing at the same time.

The cornet would give the music its basic melodic direction or as the players called it, ' its lead ' ( " Play more lead on that comet! " Oliver would tell his young protegé, Louis Armstrong ).

Above this the clarinet would weave a fluid, higher part, the trombonists, of whom Kid Ory was the most respected at this time, would fill in below in the choppy New Orleans style (known as 'tailgate', because when a band played on a cart, the trombonist had to sit facing rearwards so he could manipulate his slide over the back).

The rhythm instruments were generally drums, tuba or a string bass and perhaps a banjo, New Orleans produced some superb rhythm players in the drummers Zutty Singleton, Baby Dodds and Paul Barbarin and excellent bassists in Pops Foster and Wellman Braud.The piano was a rarity in those days, partly because it was impossible to carry on parades, picnics and other mobile festivities.

During the thirties, the New Orleans style was forgotten, but at the end of the decade a small group of fans started listening to the old recordings. On the recommendation of Louis Armstrong, the cornettist Bunk Johnson (1879-1949), a colleague of Buddy Bolden, was summoned from retirement, provided with a new pair of false teeth and was soon performing and recording to great acclaim. This was the beginning of the ' New Orleans revival '.

In the wake of Johnson other unknown players started touring and recording, amongst them the clarinettist George Lewis and the trombonist Jim Robinson. It was discovered that the semi-professional street music of New Orleans was still alive and well.

Soon young white players were trying to emulate this pre-swing style which had been superseded by Louis Armstrong, Coleman Hawkins and Duke Ellington twenty years before. In terms of worldwide popularity, New Orleans traditional jazz, or 'trad jazz' was far more important than bop.

By the early fifties it was a tremendous craze in America and Europe, especially with students and bohemians. In Europe, 'trad jazz' was the immediate forerunner of rock music and supplied many of the same danceable qualities. It is still played all over the world.

Today in New Orleans itself there are still street bands and performances at Preservation Hall, but hope for the future must rest on eclectic younger musicians, like those in the Dirty Dozen and Rebirth Brass Band who use the music of their native city as a basis for something new.

Next Time in Part 2 - Jazz In The Twenties ^

Wes George ( former Sony Jazz marketer )
Blog Page - Facebook.com/streetjazzblogpage6

On Previous Personal Notes - My Kind Of Jazz
* MKOJ 11 - Paul Desmond - Take Ten Review
* MKOJ 10 - S Getz & J Gilberto - Getz / Gilbert Review
* MKOJ 09 - Art Blakey - Moanin' Review
* MKOJ 08 - Julie London - Around Midnight Review
* MKOJ 07 - Round Midnight DVD Review
* MKOJ 06 - Dave Brubeck - Time Out Review
* MKOJ 05 - Charlie Parker - Now's The Time Review
* MKOJ 04 - Billie Holiday - Lady In Satin Review
* MKOJ 03 - John Coltrane - Blue Train Review
*
MKOJ 02 - Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue Review
*
MKOJ 01 - Overview of My Kind Of Jazz Series
* Contact Us
spacer
streetjazz banner
Personal Notes - WELCOME TO THE FALL OF 2020
ON THIS WEEK'S STREETJAZZ SHOW
STREETJAZZ


On our latest STREETJAZZ SHOW No 919 on JAZZNET247 RADIO EUROPE has 9 NEW RELEASES including the new track from guitarist Keith Andrew from his 2020 set Soul Expedition. Brian Culbertson releases another single from his XX set which is a groove called Time Flies.

Guitarist Lawson Rollins continues his releases from his True North CD with his new track
South Beach which is one of the highlights from the collection. New York bassist Christian de Mesones brings us his latest single called Sweetnight and we have a new name to the show in Rob Maletick whose Beautiful Daze is a good introduction to his first appearance on STREETJAZZ.

Canadian saxman Pat Belliveau submitted his latest album this week to the show and we are delighted to feature Amalfi Drive, the title track from the set.

Another submission this week was from another bassist Ro' Chapman and we liked his Elijah Groove to feature it as our Hot For Fall track for this week.

A recent release Finally from saxman Rhoda G gets an airing and we round up the new releases for this week with The Allen Carmen Project and our TIp For The Top entitled Fingerprints.

Our Featured Artist for the this week is the wonderful Maysa and we have two songs from her i.e. Simpatico and her guesting on a Brian Simpson album entitled Out Of A Dream from 2015 with the lovely bossa Rio Sway.

We have a superb line up on our BRAZILIAN BOSSA SEGUE with Gabriela Anders, Marcos Ariel, Bossa Nova and the very talented guitarist Jack Jezzro, don't miss his The Beach At Ipanema.

On our STREETJAZZ VAULTS feature we have many BLASTS FROM THE PASTS from vocalist Yasuko Agawa from 1986, German trumpeter and member of the PACIFIC MAMBO ORCHESTRA Steffen Kuehn, and we hear the legendary Eric Clapton singing on an OST ( Original Sound Track ) from the movie Phenomenon starring John Travolta and Change The World. My all time favourite jazz funk track Chicago Song with David Sanborn from 1987 concludes our delve into the past this week.

- Wes George

DISCOVER NEW MUSIC TODAY ON 'STREETJAZZ'

VIEW THE PLAYLIST NOW

LISTEN TO STREETJAZZ SHOW No. 919 from Wed Oct 28th

WHY YOU SHOULD BE ON STREETJAZZ ?
STREETJAZZ


If YOU are a RECORDING ARTIST playing Smooth, Contemporary, Vocal or Brazilian Jazz you might like to submit your tracks to us for consideration for inclusion on our 6 jazz specialist channels.

JAZZNET247 RADIO EUROPE and the artists featured on our STREETJAZZ show submits the new releases each week to the Groove Jazz Charts, The Nielsen's BDS Smooth Jazz Chart and we are monitored by SmoothJazz.com to pick up the latest songs for their Top 100 CHART.

We also inform the artists featured on our shows and invite them to record liners to support their music on our shows or take advantage of a FREE RADIO ADVERT which we insert across our channels to help them promote their latest track.

If you would like YOUR MUSIC considered for airplay, please visit our SUBMIT MUSIC anytime at the top of any webpage.

We look froward to hearing from you.

OUR GLOBAL APPEAL CONTINUES
image

JAZZNET247 RADIO EUROPE appeal is growing with new listeners monitored this week in THAILAND, EGYPT, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, CZECH REPUBLIC, ITALY, TURKEY, ARGENTINA, HUNGARY, HOLLAND and JAPAN.

We have daily listeners, some of whom tune in all day long, probably as background music as they work from our home country of AUSTRIA, GERMANY, ITALY, FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, JAPAN, POLAND, UK, USA, ARGENTINA, CANADA and BRAZIL.

Our shows are available across most devices and also available via LIVE365, AMAZON, DEEZER, STREEMA, SMOOTHJAZZ.COM and of course we have two versions available via our website at www.JazzNet247.net whereby you can listen to the conventional show or listen to the same tracks with MUSIC ONLY.

Being a ' truly global radio station 'with more than 75% of our listener being non-English speakers we are aware of that we cannot have lots of English voice overs, so we limit them to grapevine news and info but try to keep each show with a flow and purpose.

Each STREETJAZZ show takes 30 hours to research, produce and market each week and listeners may listen to the last 6 STREETJAZZ SHOWS linearly via or website or listen to selections from the past 200 shows via LIVE365 i.e. every 3 days has a different selection picked from our past shows, but our latest show will appear 6 times at 00.00 GMT and circa 11 -12 noon GMT each day. New STREETJAZZ shows are added each Wednesday.

If you haven't listened to our shows yet we encourage you to do so featuring the LATEST and some of the GREATEST tracks from the past 8 decades.

If you enjoy the show PLEASE PASS ON OUR LINKS to your LIKE MINDED JAZZ FRIENDS and HELP US KEEP JAZZ SAFE AND WELL. Thank you

LISTEN TO THE LATEST SHOW NOW


- Wes George

Previous Personal Notes | Next Personal Notes
spacer
image
Read the latest PERSONAL NOTES edition
banner advert Visit the SmoothJazz.com Radio Guide

© JazzNet247 Radio Europe ( Austria ) 1994 - 2020  W : www.JazzNet247.net
Your Escape From Ordinary Radio since 1994  |  A LIVE365 WORLD AUDIO DAY 2020 Featured Station
In association with   LIVE365, USA  |  Deezer, France  |  ASL Music, USA  |  Shanachie Entertainment, USA  |  Gorov Music Marketing, USA
G. F. Software, Paraguay  |  MC Promotion, USA  | 
Future Groove, USA  |  Play MPE, Canada  |  The Jingles Factory, Italy